Australia’s growing food sector: Industry needs more jobs

Industrial agriculture has seen a jump in jobs since 2014.

Photo: Daniel Munoz The number of agriculture jobs in the industry grew by 3.7 per cent between 2014 and 2016.

However, the number of workers in the sector has been falling since 2015.

The Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Federation said the figures showed there was “huge untapped potential” for jobs.

“The manufacturing sector is a global market with growing demand for agri-food products.

It is vital that the industry is supported to the highest levels of production and employment,” the federation said in a statement.

The government said it was providing a $3.2 billion injection to support the food and beverage industry in 2020-21, with the first injection of the funds in 2020 to be provided to the sector. “

We need to see more job creation in the food industry to ensure that our country continues to be a global leader in the supply chain of food, drink and medicines.”

The government said it was providing a $3.2 billion injection to support the food and beverage industry in 2020-21, with the first injection of the funds in 2020 to be provided to the sector.

Agriculture Minister Peter Dutton said the government was working hard to create a more secure food supply chain.

“It’s a complex business, and the agricultural sector plays an important role in helping ensure that this industry is safe and secure for all Australians,” he said.

“While this injection will not be enough to replace the jobs that have been lost, it will help build on the gains that have already been made.”

Industry Australia said the funding was being used to create over 1,400 jobs and to fund new infrastructure for the sector, including a $100 million agricultural infrastructure fund.

“Food is the backbone of our economy, and there is a growing demand from businesses across the sector to create jobs,” Industry Australia CEO Andrew Gough said.

Topics:government-and-politics,industry,food-processing,jobs,industries,business-economics-and

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